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Kaleidoscope of prayer wheels
Prayer wheels are also called “Mani” scripture wheels, which are related to the Six-Syllable Prayer (Om Mani Pad-me Hum). In Tibetan Buddhism, it is believed that the more you chant the Six-Syllable Prayer, the more respect you show to Buddha and the more chances you will be relieved from the six divisions of rebirth.

Ritual walkers - spirituality of Lhasa (II) 2011-05-27
Every morning, ritual walkers can be seen at almost any corner of the city, tracking clockwise around monasteries with prayer beads and wheels in hands and chanting some Buddhist sutras in a lower voice.
Ritual walkers - spirituality of Lhasa (I) 2011-05-27
Every morning, ritual walkers can be seen at almost any corner of the city, tracking clockwise around monasteries with prayer beads and wheels in hands and chanting some Buddhist sutras in a lower voice.
Kowtow rituals in Tibet 2011-05-27
The Tibetan kowtow is a ritual in Tibetan Buddhism.
Tibet through lenses--stones for praying 2011-05-11
Mani stones are carved with prayers or auspicious patterns and considered shrine objects by pilgrims.
Colorful Mani Stone 2011-05-05
Pious believers pile up Mani stones to make the mound growing up per year.
Hues of sutra streamers on the plateau 2011-05-04
Besides Mani stone and prayer wheels, tying up sutra streamers is one of the local customs for worshipping in Tibet, which can be seen on mountain peaks and passes, in front of Tibetans monasteries or nearby rivers and lakes.
A comparison on two higher Tibetan Buddhist degrees 2011-04-21
In Tibetan Buddhist learning, especially the Gelug Sect (also known as the Yellow Sect.), there are two academic degree systems, traditional and modern. Of the two systems, the highest degrees - Geshe Lharampa and "Tho Ram Pa", are conferred to the most excellent lamas.
A comparison on two higher Tibetan Buddhist degrees 2011-04-21
In Tibetan Buddhist learning, especially the Gelug Sect (also known as the Yellow Sect.), there are two academic degree systems, traditional and modern. Of the two systems, the highest degrees - Geshe Lharampa and "Tho Ram Pa", are conferred to the most excellent lamas.
'Om Mani Padme Hum', enduring six syllables 2011-04-21
With its roots in Sanskrit, "Om mani padme hum" is not only a Tibetan Buddhism prayer, but also a healthy voice production exercise. The chant is common to the Lotus sect of Tantric Buddhism and originated in the holy song sung by the Born-in-Lotus Buddha (Guru Padmasambhava) during his search for nirvana. Later it was made into a repetitive chant by Buddha Avalokitesvara (Guanyin Bodhisattva).
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